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thai cooking class booking

"Prung Thai" The best Thai Cookery School offers authentic Thai cooking classes in southern Thailand. Courses are taught in English and feature essentials like fruit and vegetable carving, a unique Executive Master Thai chef skill experience of five-star hotel . Here you get a much more in depth cooking experience.

The cooking course at Prung Thai Cooking School is an ideal home-style learning environment that is different from most of the hotels and restaurants in Thailand. Thinking of taking a class on the last day of your stay, Prung Thai Cooking School can eventually wrap up your journey to Thailand wonderfully! Learn how to cook healthy and delicious Thai food to surprise your family and friends at home as a gourmet souvenir form Thailand. Real hands-on experience.We has lots of fun activities that you can take it. Step on your own.

Dazzle your friends and family with your ability to produce authentic and delicious dishes from Thailand with this 100% hands-on cooking class. Following a few simple demonstrations, you will commence preparing your Thai dishes, one at a time under his watchful eye and gentle instructions. Afterwards taste your dishes for lunch to complete this unique and truly Thai experience.

*** Herbal water will be available during the class. ***

Yam Woon Sen Tom Kha Gai
Gaeng Kiew
Waan Gai
Tom Yam Goong

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Prungthai Cooking Home at Trip Advisor CLICK HERE

Thai food is internationally famous. Whether chilli-hot or comparatively bland, harmony is the guiding principle behind each dish. Thai cuisine is essentially a marriage of centuries-old Eastern and Western influences harmoniously combined into something uniquely Thai. Characteristics of Thai food depend on who cooks it, for whom it is cooked, for what occasion, and where it is cooked. Dishes can be refined and adjusted to suit all palates.

Originally, Thai cooking reflected the characteristics of a waterborne lifestyle. Aquatic animals, plant and herbs were major ingredients. Large chunks of meat were eschewed. Subsequent influences introduced the use of sizeable chunks to Thai cooking. With their Buddhist background, Thais shunned the use of large animals in big chunks. Big cuts of meat were shredded and laced with herbs and spices. Traditional Thai cooking methods were stewing and baking, or grilling. Chinese influences saw the introduction of frying, stir-frying and deep-frying. Culinary influences from the 17th century onwards included Portuguese, Dutch, French and Japanese. Chilies were introduced to Thai cooking during the late 1600s by Portuguese missionaries who had acquired a taste for them while serving in South America. Thais were very adapting at "Siameseising" foreign cooking methods, and substituting ingredients. The ghee used in Indian cooking was replaced by coconut oil, and coconut milk substituted for other dairy products.

Overpowering pure spices were toned down and enhanced by fresh herbs such as lemon grass and galanga. Eventually, fewer and less spices were used in Thai curries, while the use of fresh herbs increased. It is generally acknowledged that Thai curries burn intensely, but briefly, whereas other curries, with strong spices, burn for longer periods. Instead of serving dishes in courses, a Thai meal is served all at once, permitting diners to enjoy complementary combinations of different tasters.

A proper Thai meal should consist of a soup, a curry dish with condiments, a dip with accompanying fish and vegetables. A spiced salad may replace the curry dish. The soup can also be spicy, but the curry should be replaced by a non-spiced item. There must be harmony of tastes and textures within individual dishes and the entire meal.

Spicy Thai Food: Thai food is famous for its small chillies/pimento ("Phrik Khi Noo"). They come in a variety of colours including red and green. Usually they are cut in slices for the Thai food dishes. They can also be ground. A common misconception by people is that they think they can get rid of the spicy taste by drinking water. This is untrue. A good way to get rid of the spicy taste is to eat rice.

Food in Thai Culture: Thai's often discuss food as part of their daily conversation. A common way to open a dialogue with another person would be by asking them if they have already eaten. Throughout the cities and rural areas of Thailand, you will find loud, colorful and crowded markets.

Click here to read   Thai Herbs in Cooking

The Special combination of herbs and species used in preparing Thai dishes is what gives Thai food its very distinctive character, both within Thailand and throughout the world. There are 27 main herbs and species, which form the real basic for Thai cooking with that special Thai flavor.

Chili ( Prik ) Chili is an erect, branched, shrub-like herb with fruits used as garnishing and flavouring in Thai dishes. There are many different species. All contain capsaicin, a biologically active ingredient beneficial to the respiratory system, blood pressure and heart. Other therapeutic uses include being a, carminative and anti flatulence agent, and digestant.

Cumin: "Yi-ra" in Thai Cumin is a small shrubbery herb, the fruit of which contains a 2-4% volatile oil with a pungent odour, and which is used as a flavouring and condiment. Cumin's therapeutic properties manifest as a stomachic, bitter tonic, carminative, stimulant and astringent.

Coriander:"Pak Chee" in Thai This member of the carrot family has delicate leaves and deep roots. Wen the plant reach maturity, it produces abundant white flowers. The leaves and seeds are used in many cuisine throughout the world, but Thai cooking makes use of the roots as well.The round, beige seeds are added to curries and vegetables. The root are crushed with garlic to flavor meat and are often added to soup, especially beef soups, The leaves are used extensively as a garnish.

Cloves:"Kan Plou" in Thai Marco Polo thought that cloves came from Java, but Conti discovered that they actually originated from Moluccas Islands. From there the use of cloves spread to other parts of Southeast Asia and to Europe.In Thai cuisine, cloves are added to curries and they also go very well with tomatoes, salty vegetables and ham. In Thailand, cloves have traditionally been chewed with betel leaves. Medicinally, Thais believe that cloves kill bacteria and also act as an antispasmodic. Cloves can be chewed after meals, as some Thais do, to aid digestion.

Garlic: "Kra-tiem" in Thai Garlic is an annual herbaceous plant with underground bulbs comprising several cloves. Dried mature bulbs are used as a flavouring and condiment in Thai cuisine. The bulbs contain 0.1-0.36% garlic oil and organic sulfur compounds. Therapeutic uses are as an antimicrobial, diaphoretic, diuretic, expectorant, anti flatulence and cholesterol lowering agents.

Ginger: "Khing" in Thai Ginger is an erect plant with thickened, fleshy and aromatic rhizomes. Used in different forms as a food, flavouring and spice. Ginger's rhizomes contain a 1-2% volatile oil. Ginger's therapeutic uses are as a carminative, antinauseant and antiflatulence agent.

Galanga: "Kha" in Thai Greater Galanga is an erect annual plant with aromatic, ginger-like rhizomes, and commonly used in Thai cooking as a flavouring. The approximately 0.04 volatile oil content has therapeutic uses as carminative, stomachic, antirheumatic and antimicrobial agents.

Hoary Basil: "Maeng-lak" in Thai Hoary Basil is an annual herbaceous plant with slightly hairy and pale green leaves, eaten either raw or used as a flavouring, and containing approximately 0.7% volatile oil. Therapeutic benefits include the alleviation of cough symptoms, and as diaphoretic and carminative agents.

Kafffir: "Ma-krut" in Thai The leaves, peel and juice of the Kaffir Lime are used as a flavouring in Thai cuisine. The leaves and peel contain a volatile oil. The major therapeutic benefit of the juice is as an appetizer.

Lesser ginger "Krachai" in Thai This erect annual plant with aromatic rhizomes and yellow-brown roots, is used as a flavouring. The rhizomes contain approximately 0.8% volatile oil. The plant has stomach ache relieving and antimicrobial properties, and therapeutic benefits as an antitussive and antiflatulence agent.

Lemon Grass: "Ta-krai" in Thai This erect annual plant resembles a coarse gray-green grass. Fresh leaves and grass are used as flavouring. Lemon grass contains a 0.2-0.4 volatile oil. Therapeutic properties are as a diuretic, emmanagogue, antiflatulence, anti flu and antimicrobial agent.

Lime: "Ma-now" in Thai Lime is used principally as a garnish for fish and meat dishes. The fruit contains Hesperidins and Naringin , scientifically proven antiinflammatory flavonoids. Lime juice is used as an appetizer, and has antitussive, anti flu, stomachic and antiscorbutic properties.

Marsh Mint: "Sa-ra-nae" in Thai The fresh leaves of this herbaceous plant are used as a flavouring and eaten raw in Thai cuisine. Volatile oil contents give the plant several therapeutic uses, including carminative, mild antiseptic, local anesthetic, diaphoretic and digestant properties.

Pepper: "Phrik-Thai" in Thai Pepper is a branching, perennial climbing plant from whose fruiting spikes both white and black pepper are obtained. Used as a spice and condiment, pepper contains a 2-4% volatile oil. Therapeutic uses are as carminative, antipyretic, diaphoretic and diuretic agents.

Holy Basil: "Ka-prow" in Thai Sacred Basil is an annual herbaceous plant that resembles Sweet Basil but has narrower and often times reddish-purple leaves. The fresh leaves, which are used as a flavouring, contain approximately 0.5%volatile oil, which exhibits antimicrobial activity, specifically as a carminative, diaphoretic, expectorant and stomachic.

Shallot: "Hom,Hom-lek,Hom-daeng"in Thai Shallots, or small red onions, are annual herbaceous plants. Underground bulbs comprise garlic-like cloves. Shallot bulbs contain a volatile oil, and are used as flavouring or seasoning agents. Therapeutic properties include the alleviation of stomach discomfort, and as an antihelmintic, antidiarrhoeal, expectorant, antitussive, diuretic and anti flu agents.

Sweet Basil: "Ho-ra-pha" in Thai Sweet Basil is an annual herbaceous plant, the fresh leaves of which are either eaten raw or used as a flavouring in Thai cooking. Volatile oil content varies according to different varieties. Therapeutic properties are as carminative, diaphoretic, expectorant, digestant and stomachic agents.

Turmeric: "Kha-min" in Thai Turmeric is a member of the ginger family, and provides yellow colouring for Thai food. The rhizomes contain a 3-4% volatile oil with unique aromatic characteristics. Turmeric's therapeutic properties manifest as a carminative, antiflatulence and stomachic.

Learn Useful Thai Words

Aharn = Food

Aroi = Deliciuos

Chan Hew = I am hungry

Chan Im = I am full

Dong = Pickled

Gai = Chicken

Kem = Salty

Khai = Egg

Khoa Niew = Sticky Rice

Khoa = Rice

Krob = Crispy

Goong = Shrimp

Mamuang = Mango

Manow = Lime

Mapraw = Coconut

Moo = Pork

Nham = Water

Nua = Beef

Pad = Stir-fried

Ped = Spicy

Plah = Fish

Preaow = Sour

Prik = Pepper

Poo = Crab

Tom = Boiling

Tam = Pounding with a mortar and pestle

Waan = Sweet

Yang = Roasted, grilled

Yam = Salad; literally "to mix with the hands"

Address: 52/276 Moo 2, Phuket Villa 2 Soi Charoewadee 12, T.Wichit,

Muang Phuket Town, Phuket 83000 Thailand

Phone: (66) 076.263.115 Mobile: (66) 99-216-0236 :/ email: chefpairoj@prungthai.com :/ www.prungthail.com

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